Ivy Bookshop Good Reads

paginated
By Timothy Ryback
October 29, 2014

Stranger than fiction: In 1933, a Bavarian prosecutor won indictments against SS members for the murders of four prisoners at Dachau. “Hitler’s First Victims” is a short, fascinating, disturbing story of an honest man’s courage and of the treatment of Nazi Germany’s first concentration camp victims ó political prisoners shot or beaten to death for CONTINUE »

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BY Robert Gluck/JNS.org
October 23, 2014

By Laura Silver Brandeis, 300 pages The history of the knish represents more than just the lineage of a fried, dumpling-like food. It demonstrates the often-central role of food in communities and cultural legacies. Laura Silver knows that all too well. She has consumed knishes on three different continents, and her exhaustive research on the CONTINUE »

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BY Neal Gendler
October 16, 2014

By Richard Cohen Simon and Schuster, 273 pages Is Israel good for the Jews? No, not if you prefer discrimination, exclusion, expulsion, persecution, pogroms and murder in the millions. Of course Israel is good for the Jews, as Richard Cohen makes more than abundantly clear in this book, recounting our woeful, disaster-filled history since exile CONTINUE »

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BY Melissa Gerr
October 9, 2014

by Israel Horovitz Three Rooms Press, 102 pages Acclaimed playwright, author and director Israel Horovitz has spent a lifetime crafting story arcs for the stage, screen and his readers’ imaginations. Now 75, he’s published his first book of poetry, offering a collection of compelling verse that, written throughout his lifetime, echoes the story of his CONTINUE »

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BY Simone Ellin
October 2, 2014

By Baron Wormer Piscataqua Press, 336 pages Though Baron Wormser has published 12 books of poetry and is Maine’s poet laureate, “Teach Us That Peace,” published in November 2013, is his first novel. Set in the Baltimore of Wormser’s adolescence (he was born here in 1948), “Teach Us That Peace” paints a vivid picture of CONTINUE »