Special Coverage

May 30, 2013

A family’s sukkah can be their home away from home. Like a collection of charming, if sometimes haphazard, larger-than-life boxes, sukkahs begin appearing outside Israeli homes soon after Yom Kippur. It’s almost a tradition, in fact, to start work on the booths hours after the fast is over.CONTINUE »

May 30, 2013

If Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur prepare the mind for teshuvah, repentance, and help the soul achieve divine forgiveness, then Sukkot is like a congratulations party for the body after a long, spiritual journey. Also called zeman simhateinu, the season of our rejoicing, Sukkot is about joy and giving thanks. When the children of Israel CONTINUE »

May 30, 2013

Leviticus 23:39-43 discusses the Children of Israel wandering about after the Exodus, and God directs Jews to live in sukkot in commemoration. But it’s not just a matter of building the temporary home. God also tells His people to take “the fruit of goodly trees, branches of palm trees and boughs of thick trees and CONTINUE »

May 30, 2013

Ilene Spector Special to the Jewish Times In Europe, just after the break-the-fast meal was over, Jews would proceed to hammer the first nail to begin building the sukkah. Observant Jews today remember these makeshift huts by building similar structures out of wood, branches, harvest vines and fruits. The idea is to be open to CONTINUE »

May 30, 2013

Ilene Spector Special to the Jewish Times Sukkot is the Jewish Thanksgiving. The word, meaning booths, refers to the tents or temporary dwellings of the ancient Israelites who wandered in the desert in search of the promised land. Later, the shelters also were used as harvesters’ huts before the onset of winter. So Sukkot has CONTINUE »