Special Coverage

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Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, yoga, mindfulness, meditation and nutrition
BY Adriane Stein Kozlovsky
August 29, 2013

What do the Hebrew month of Elul — the month leading up to Rosh Hashanah — and the 10 days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur have to do with yoga? They all give the opportunity to reflect, be introspective, consider the past and think about the future with all of its wonderful possibilities. On CONTINUE »

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Shofar makers explain the delicate process of turning rough animal horns into ceremonial instruments
BY Marc Shapiro
August 29, 2013

The sound of the shofar is unmistakable — its loud, triumphant blasts can be heard throughout Rosh Hashanah services and during Yom Kippur when the fast is over. But that hollow, smooth, shimmering, resonant horn heard in synagogue took meticulous handiwork to transform from the crude horn of an animal to a majestic shofar. “They’re CONTINUE »

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Songs for the High Holidays
BY Binyamin Kagedan
August 29, 2013

In time for the 2013 High Holiday season, here is a list of the Top 5 popular songs to put you in the mood for introspection, repentance and renewal — and a few just to make you smile: 1. “Who By Fire” (Leonard Cohen) The consummate coffeehouse theologian lands in the No. 1 spot on CONTINUE »

For many American Jews, Hebrew prayers are challenging to follow.
The art and essence of tefila
BY Maayan Jaffe
August 22, 2013

According to the Talmud (Rosh Hashanah 18a), the period between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, the 10 days of penitence, is the time period when God is considered to be both “found” and “close.” And it’s not uncommon for Jews to feel during the month of Elul and then the High Holiday period an itch CONTINUE »

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While members of the Baltimore Jewish Cultural Chavurah are practicing Jews, they don’t practice religion
BY Simone Ellin
August 22, 2013

Elise Saltzberg is a fourth-generation Secular Jew with a capital S. “A secular Jew with a small s is often translated to mean unaffiliated and uninvolved,” explained Saltzberg, 56, of Pikesville, a founding member of the Baltimore Jewish Cultural Chavurah, a Secular Humanistic congregation founded by Rabbi Judith Seid about 15 years ago. “Growing up, CONTINUE »