Sober Purim

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While many people can’t wait to crack open the booze each Purim, some in Baltimore’s Jewish community find themselves in a difficult situation, struggling to balance a recovery from addiction with a religious tradition. “I think Purim is, in some ways, an exception to prove a rule, which is that, by and large, our approach… Read More

Purim Change of Pace Choose chocolate as a flavored dough

Triple chocolate hamantaschen would make a wonderful treat in coffee-themed Purim baskets.

Hamantaschen talk is always about the filling: prune, poppy, apricot and strawberry, just to name a few favorites. I love being creative with the fillings, but this year I wanted to change up things with a flavored dough rather than just a fun filling. And what better ingredient to include than chocolate. Once you have… Read More

Purim Roundup! A selection of festive events around town

Purim begins at sundown on Wednesday, March 5. The JT has put together a selection of events and megillah readings in the area. From wine-and-cheese receptions to tot Purim events, there are plenty of ways to celebrate the holiday. All events are open to the public.   BALTIMORE CITY AND COUNCIL Arugas Habosem • March… Read More

Green Chanukah

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The miracle of Chanukah is an epic story of conservation, as one day’s worth of oil lasts for eight days in the Jewish Temple. Now, in some circles, energy conservation and energy independence are increasing hallmarks of modern-day Chanukah. One of the first organizations to ‘[emphasize this concept was the Coalition on the Environment and… Read More

The Need to be United

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As winter arrives and the days grow shorter, outdoor lighting is needed more during the Chanukah season than at any other time of year. This need is taken particularly seriously in Israel, where outdoor menorahs make a nocturnal stroll through city streets a treat for the eyes — and for the spirit. The outdoor Chanukah… Read More

Let The Wine Flow

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The Rosh Hashanah meal is a festive affair. Traditions abound as to how the evening meal can bring good tidings for the year ahead. While some stick to apple and honey for a sweet new year, others recite a full array of blessings over different symbolic food types, from increasing in numbers like the seeds… Read More

Broken Hallelujah

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The name David means “beloved,” and the Israelite king bearing that name was — and remains — just that. “To this day at almost every celebration, Jews sing ‘David, King of Israel, alive, alive and everlasting,’” writes Rabbi David Wolpe in this brief, lyrical biography of his namesake, Israel’s second king who ruled around the… Read More

What You Need to Know

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TEL AVIV — When Rosh Hashanah comes later this month, Israel’s Jewish farmers won’t just be celebrating the start of a new year. They’ll be marking a year in which they are prohibited from doing their jobs. Called Shemitah, the Torah-mandated, yearlong farming hiatus is felt across Israel, affecting its fields, supermarkets and, of course,… Read More

Out of the Woodwork

Schoolteacher Jerry Pepper never dreamed he would sell the lecterns known in the Orthodox Jewish world as shtenders as a side job. As the owner of Pepper’s Podiums, he started retailing solid wood products after meeting an Amish woodworker in Elkton, Ky. Inspired by his work, Pepper opened his own company five years ago in… Read More

A Taste of Honey

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The traditional Rosh Hashanah taste of apples dipped in honey, as well as the challah with honey (instead of salt) taken at meals through the end of Sukkot, invoke thoughts and prayers for a sweet New Year and for the months that follow. “The honey concept is interesting because it’s a contradiction,” observed Rochel Kaplan,… Read More