Judge Wiesel by His Company

Pirkei Avot counsels aseh lecha rav; we are known by the company we keep. With whom does Elie Wiesel make it a point of palling around in public (“Your Say,” March 20)? There is casino mogul Sheldon Adelson, who is on record as being hostile to democracy, Shmuley Boteach, and “King Bibi” Netanyahu, best-known recently… Read More

Outreach Mission Got Buried

In the March 20 local news item “United Through Motherhood,” why was it not noted until the 10th paragraph that the Jewish Women’s Renaissance Project is an Orthodox organization, and one devoted to outreach at that? Why was this fact not highlighted upfront, at the outset? Sadly, such is the sort of deceit and misleading… Read More

Why the Change?

I object to the new format of your obituary e-mail notifications. It’s annoying to have to open another page (particularly on-the-go, with sometimes spotty reception) and I often don’t know the deceased, but do know one of the family members mentioned later in death notices. Please go back to the old format with the text… Read More

Amassing Solutions Through Citizen Impact

One question that everyone who cares about making their community a better place to live has struggled to answer is: How do we start to make improvement? Innovation and relevance are definitely keys to unlock these answers. And deputizing citizens to become a part of the solution can accumulate immense amount of impact. Citizens rallying… Read More

Celebrate Freedom with Fair Trade Chocolate

A few movies have affected me so deeply that I knew a new journey was opening for me. One of those was “The Dark Side of Chocolate,” which I saw at the Fair Trade Federation conference in fall 2010. It explicitly documents child labor’s role in the cocoa fields of the Ivory Coast. I was… Read More

Making Sense of Unspeakable Tragedy

Editor-in-Chief

The Jewish world united in grief this week, shocked at the inexplicable tragedy that claimed seven children in Brooklyn, N.Y. Like many parents here in Baltimore and beyond, my heart reached out to Gabriel Sassoon, the father who had spent Shabbat at a religious conference and was thus saved, his wife Gayle and their 15-year-old… Read More

Tackling Race by the Cup

Employees on the front lines of the service economy are compelled to say a lot of things to customers at corporate behest, whether it’s “Would you like to supersize that?” or by responding to “Thank you” with the unnatural “My pleasure.” As of Sunday, baristas at Starbucks will no longer have to worry about following… Read More

Netanyahu’s Victory

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, flanked by his wife and Likud Party supporters, has a lot of fence-mending to do.
(Miriam Alster/Flash90)

In last week’s election, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu defied polls, surprised pundits and confounded expectations by pulling off a clear victory. We congratulate him as he negotiates a coalition for his historic fourth term as prime minister. We are concerned, however, that there was a heavy price for Netanyahu’s victory. His last-minute renunciation of… Read More

The Victorious Victim Parshat Vayikra

I always experience a sense of excitement when I begin a new book. I am convinced that most avid readers feel the same way. This Shabbat gives us an opportunity to experience that excitement as we begin a new book, the Book of Leviticus, with Parshat Vayikra. Leviticus has historically had mixed reviews. On the… Read More

The Muslim Reality

Joshua Runyan’s column “A Matter of Survival” (March 13) misses the reality of the situation. Ten percent of the Muslim population of 1.4 billion believe in the radical Islamic theology and believe in Muslim supremacy and world domination. There is no hope of dialogue or accommodation with this increasingly violent segment.