Addressing Racial Bias

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In Ferguson, Mo., and again in Staten Island, N.Y., the widely reported decisions by grand juries not to indict white police officers accused of killing unarmed black men has brought protesters into the streets. The Jewish community, while not silent on the decisions, has been spotty in its response, perhaps reflecting the view that as… Read More

Our Jewish Birthright
Parshat Vayishlach

The biblical kashrut laws for Jews have always been a powerful tool in keeping us a “nation set apart.” We left Jacob last week leaving Laban and Laban-land behind, heaven-bent on returning to the land of Abraham and to the house of Isaac. Jacob understands that his inner self has been overtaken by the deceitful… Read More

We at the BZD Mourn with Israel

The horrific slaughter of four rabbis, who were reciting morning prayers in a Jerusalem synagogue, is still one more reminder of the hatred and outrageous actions perpetrated by Palestinian terrorists in the name of Islam (“Horror in Har Nof,” Nov. 21). Equally disturbing are the wild, joyous celebrations that occurred among Palestinians, both in Gaza… Read More

Thank you, JT

Every week I look forward to reading your thorough coverage of the Jewish world. I read the heartbreaking article about the funerals of the murdered rabbis (“Horror in Har Nof,” Nov. 21). Many news organizations, even The New York Times, reported thousands came to pay the rabbis their final respects. Even the sad  photo and… Read More

Meeting the Jewish World’s New, Urgent Need

The rise in anti-Israel and anti-Semitic activities in academia begs for an effective strategy to address this new challenge. As Jewish teens arrive on college campuses, they are thrust into a vulnerable position: unprepared, uninformed, and unable to cope with hostility, antagonism and even worse against Israel and Jews. Furthermore, the problems in academia are… Read More

We’re Young, But We Get It

Two weeks ago, thousands of American Jewish leaders from across the country gathered outside Washington, D.C., for the Jewish Federations of North America’s General Assembly to discuss issues pertaining to Israel, Jewish continuity and campus life. One of the more engaging programs at the GA was a plenary panel featuring journalists I admire: Jeffrey Goldberg,… Read More

Walking the Walk

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Hours after terrorists shot up the Kehilat Bnei Torah synagogue in Jerusalem two weeks ago and massacred four of its tefillin-clad worshippers, pictures and video of the American media’s initial coverage of the attack went viral. Passed along by thousands of indignant users of social networks, one clip in particular offered a window into what… Read More

Understanding Conversion

With all of the talk about the technicalities of conversion and the alleged abuse of the system, the core of what conversion is and why the process seems so convoluted has been lost. For any intelligent discussion to take place, it is essential that this be clarified. What is conversion? On the one hand, the… Read More

Democrats Painfully Quiet in Primary

I respectfully disagree with Doug Gansler when he stated that the reason he lost the gubernatorial primary election was due to the Democratic establishment and machine (“Gansler Looks Ahead,” Nov. 21). I voted for Gansler in the primary, but, unfortunately, the voter turnout for that election, I believe, was less than 20 percent. The voice… Read More

Look to Torah for God’s Forgiveness

I was shocked and saddened about the scandal related to Rabbi Barry Freundel (“Prominent Rabbi Arrested,” Oct. 17; “Freundel Had Planned More Student Tours,” Oct. 31). As a former Washingtonian and author of “The Jewish Community of Washington, D.C.,” I had visited Freundel’s synagogue, Kesher Israel, on a number of occasions. My great-grandfather, Morris Garfinkle,… Read More