You Can Count on Chaverim

On the Sunday of the big snow (“The Blizzard that Battered Baltimore,” Jan. 29), I received an automated call from the MTA saying that all special vans for disabled people had been canceled for the next day. My father, who lives in assisted living on Park Heights Avenue, would not have a ride for his… Read More

Listen, Converse!

Editorial Director

At first glance, it’s so obvious that it’s a wonder anyone considers it revolutionary: If you want to increase your community members’ level of engagement, ask them what they think and what they want, and then empower them to do it. Put it another, albeit circular, way: If you want to increase engagement, engage! That’s… Read More

My House, and His House Parshat Terumah

There is a well-known joke that is told about the Jews that I find particularly sad. The joke tells of a group of explorers who find a Jew who has been stranded on a desert island for years. As he takes them around the island and shows them how he survived, they find that he… Read More

We Are All God’s Children

During President Barack Obama’s historic address at the Islamic Society of Baltimore, he said, “At a time when others are trying to divide us along lines of religion or sect, we have to reaffirm that most fundamental of truths: We are all God’s children. We’re all born equal, with inherent dignity.” The idea that we… Read More

Bernie Sanders and the Jewish Question

Thanks to Bernie Sanders’ strong showing in the early Democratic presidential primary races, America is finally having its Jewish moment. While American Jews are relatively well-to-do and integrated into the country’s social, political and economic fabric, the Vermont senator’s predicted win in Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary has raised questions of what role his being a… Read More

A Building Block at the Kotel

Controversy still surrounds the Western Wall, even with the compromise. (Deror Avi via wikimediacommons)

You can tell that a true compromise was reached on a matter by the number of people on both sides of the issue who are dissatisfied with the result. And so it is with the agreement on egalitarian prayer at the Western Wall compound below the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. While hailed as a breakthrough… Read More

Steps in Restoring Justice

Today, there are an estimated 100,000 Americans in solitary confinement in U.S. prisons. Ten thousand of them  are federal inmates. A fraction of those federal prisoners will benefit from President Barack Obama’s recent executive order to remove the most vulnerable from solitary  confinement. The president’s directive is an important step but just a start, in… Read More

Eugene Borowitz Defined Dilemma of the Modern Jew

Rabbi David Ellenson

In “Ethics of the  Fathers,” the rabbis teach that we must grant respect and honor to an individual who teaches us even the smallest bit of knowledge. For those of us who were the students of Rabbi Eugene Borowitz, who died last week at the age of 91, the obligation is increased a thousandfold because… Read More

Something To Cell-A-Brate!

Thank you for bringing Hadassah Hospital’s exciting announcement of a breakthrough in ALS research to your readers (“ALS Clinical Trials at Hadassah Hospital ‘Very Encouraging,’” Jan. 22. As president of Hadassah Greater Baltimore, I am prouder than ever of the researchers and doctors at our state-of-the-art hospitals in Israel who are dedicating their lives to… Read More

Nearly 1 Million Jews Erased From History

In an act more reminiscent of magician Harry Houdini than a major U.S. newspaper, The Washington Post omitted nearly 1 million Jewish refugees from Arab lands in a chart “A visual guide to 75 years of major refugee crises around the world” (Dec. 21, 2015). The online infographic, claiming to provide a “brief guide to… Read More