Settlement Amnesia Afflicts Martin Indyk

A form of amnesia must be affecting the Obama administration’s former chief Mideast negotiator, Martin Indyk. It is, however, a very selective kind of amnesia — he forgets only concessions that Israel has made. Speaking recently at a conference in Tel Aviv, Indyk declared that the only reason there are no peace talks between Israel… Read More

The Truth about Labeling

The deadly terror attacks in Paris on Nov. 13 and their  aftermath have overshadowed a decision made by the European Union two days earlier: that all member states must label products from Israeli settlements in the West Bank and Golan Heights as originating from those locations, rather than as “made in Israel.” While the move… Read More

Giving and Gratitude

Editor-in-Chief

Jewish tradition teaches that there’s no greater mitzvah than the giving of tzedakah. Extend the concept and you can conclude that there’s no greater act than that of helping out your fellow human being, of giving something up of yourself — your time, your talents, your possessions — to make another person’s life that much… Read More

Grandstanding on the Backs of Refugees

Refugees with temporary  documents board a ferry to take them to Athens at the port of the Greek island of Kos in August. (Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)

In a year when political discourse includes the idea of building a wall on the Mexican border “with a really big door” to keep outsiders out, it probably shouldn’t have come as a surprise when 31 governors, all but one of them Republicans, took a gratuitous shot at the victims of the Syrian civil war… Read More

Climbing the Ladder of Responsibility Parshat Vayetzei

This Shabbat, we read a haftarah from the Book of Hosea. The prophet Hosea lived during the eighth century B.C.E. under King Jeroboam II’s rule, when Israel was divided into two kingdoms, the Northern consisting of 10 tribes and the Southern consisting of two tribes. In the haftarah, Jacob is compared to the Northern Kingdom… Read More

Left-Right Confusion

The photograph on the cover of the Nov. 6 edition of the JT, commemorating veterans, is backward (look at the Hebrew letters). During an inspection, any of us who proudly wore the uniform would have been reprimanded if our ribbons or insignia were on the wrong side.

JT Doesn’t Get It

The last time I checked, the Jaffe family has been a subscriber to the Jewish Times for more than 50 years. The last time I checked, I’m Jewish and live in Pikesville. The last time I checked, Pikesville is in the state of Maryland. The last time I checked, I am a filed Democratic candidate… Read More

The Real Fight Against Evil

People place flowers and candles near the scene of the Bataclan concert Hall terrorist attack in Paris. (Jeff Mitchell/Getty Images)

The outpouring of grief for the victims of last  Friday’s terror attack in Paris and the tricolored expressions of solidarity show how close to home the Islamic State killings hit people around the world. For a country rocked in  January by the brutal murders at Charlie Hebdo magazine and the Hyper Cacher supermarket, the French… Read More

The Pain of Our Elders

Editor-in-Chief

I remember my first history teacher in junior high invoking a famous aphorism in defense of her claiming an hour and a half every other day of a roomful of rambunctious adolescents’ time: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” For the immediate purposes of that class, the inability to remember… Read More

First Amendment Provides the Muscle

The University of Missouri community and millions of YouTube viewers got a painful civics lesson last week as the campus was convulsed by protests against racism, leading to the resignation of two top university officials. While all that was going on, a  student journalist was prevented from photographing a temporary encampment by a group of… Read More