Staying Ahead of Crises

hazardous material crew cleans the apartment of Thomas Eric Duncan. Duncan was the first Ebola case 
diagnosed in the U.S. He died on Oct. 8.

Recent news of the first transmission of the Ebola virus in the U.S. — a nurse in Texas infected by the disease while treating the now-deceased Thomas Eric Duncan, with the CDC attributing her infection to a breakdown in protocol — is spreading fear in a way that the reality of the 4,000 dead in… Read More

A Close Race: Be Counted

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In case you haven’t noticed, Maryland’s got a gubernatorial race shaping up. If the latest polling numbers are any indication, in a state where registered Democrats outnumber Republicans 2-to-1, GOP candidate Larry Hogan has narrowed a once-commanding lead enjoyed by Democratic Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown to anywhere from 9 percentage points (The Washington Post) to… Read More

Democrats’ Solution: Tax, tax, tax

The Jewish Times Oct. 3 cover story, “Being Purple,”  was biased and infuriating. The Jewish community needs to wake up and see the truth. Under the O’Malley/Brown administration over the past eight years, Maryland residents have had 70 new taxes and fees imposed on them. Many businesses and families are fleeing the state to more… Read More

Avoiding Chaos on Yom Kippur

I appreciated Marc Shapiro’s Sept. 26 article “Yom Kippur Without Fasting.” At our old shul in Richmond (with an aging population) we noted a large number of members who either had multiple medical problems and were on multiple medications or just stubbornly insisted on fasting. Predictably, on Yom Kippur afternoon, people started hitting the floor…. Read More

Justice, Charity Go Arm in Arm

Bravo to the Jewish Times for encouraging everyone to engage in the work of justice, and not only the work of charity (“A Hunger for Justice,” Oct. 3). This exact sentiment is why MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger works so hard to affect policy change. Our nation’s safety net must remain intact to provide… Read More

Connect With Us Online

The Internet has changed the way we communicate, shop and interact within our community. A national survey to mark the 25th anniversary of the Web, conducted by the Pew Research Center, quantified its incredible reach and impact. Today, 87 percent of Americans use the Internet, with near-saturation usage among those living in households earning $75,000… Read More

BBYO: A Truly International Experience

BBYO teens around the world had been waiting with great anticipation for the morning of Sept. 30, when online registration opened for the organization’s largest convention of the year — the International Convention. With more than 2,000 teens expected to register, BBYO staff nervously monitored its website, hoping it wouldn’t crash as the clock turned… Read More

On El Al, We Are One People

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Airline travel is difficult enough without passengers making a scene. But that’s what occurred on an El Al flight from New York to Tel Aviv just before Rosh Hashanah, when a number of haredi men went so far as to try to pay other passengers so they would not have to sit next to women… Read More

Sweden’s False Steps

Whether it was a declaration of diplomatic independence or a move designed to give the peace process a boost, the announcement last week by new Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven that his country plans to recognize the state of Palestine is unwelcome. While it is true that more than 130 countries have already recognized Palestine… Read More

Waiting for the Chips to Fall

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There’s no such thing as a free lunch, they say, and you don’t need to look further than the city’s Cheswolde neighborhood for proof. There on Taney Road stands the new headquarters of Hatzalah, built with the help of a grant tied to state revenue gleaned from slot machines. While some, mindful of the Talmudic… Read More