Opening Thoughts

BY Joshua Runyan
July 24, 2014

Three decades ago, faith communities across the Southwestern United States, seeing as their moral duty to protect the downtrodden and vulnerable from what they saw as an almost certain death sentence, decided to break the law and harbor illegal immigrants who had arrived from Central America. Moved by a sense of humanity and an anti-establishment CONTINUE »

BY Hannah M. Heller
July 24, 2014

“I am now a vegetarian,” our daughter, 11, announced proudly one night in 2001. “Why now,” I wanted to know? “I just bought one of your favorite foods — hot dogs.” To many people, becoming a vegetarian can appear to be a phase until the newness and excitement wear off. Our Gila, however, is a CONTINUE »

BY Joshua Runyan
July 10, 2014

According to the biblical account, creation didn’t take place through fire or a divine wind. The world instead came into being through speech. As taught and amplified by the Jewish tradition in the thousands of years since that seminal event, words — even when limited to the constricted realm of human speech — have retained CONTINUE »

BY Joshua Runyan
July 2, 2014

This column was supposed to begin on a positive note, seeing in the recent fundraising prowess of The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore a message that Jewish unity is alive and strong and can be marshaled to face the challenges of poverty and generational apathy. That all remains true, but Monday afternoon, the world CONTINUE »

BY Joshua Runyan
June 26, 2014

In the current economy, the concept of a vacation, especially for the working poor among us, is something of a luxury. And even among those for whom a vacation is a given, financial realities have made “staycations” a common feature of American life. That’s why it’s great to live in a place like Baltimore, where CONTINUE »