Avoiding Chaos on Yom Kippur

I appreciated Marc Shapiro’s Sept. 26 article “Yom Kippur Without Fasting.” At our old shul in Richmond (with an aging population) we noted a large number of members who either had multiple medical problems and were on multiple medications or just stubbornly insisted on fasting. Predictably, on Yom Kippur afternoon, people started hitting the floor…. Read More

Justice, Charity Go Arm in Arm

Bravo to the Jewish Times for encouraging everyone to engage in the work of justice, and not only the work of charity (“A Hunger for Justice,” Oct. 3). This exact sentiment is why MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger works so hard to affect policy change. Our nation’s safety net must remain intact to provide… Read More

Join Us for Joyful Jewish Experience

Simone Ellin’s article on the East Bank Havurah (“A Time for Renewal,” Sept. 19) reflected well the history and character of our group. I received a warm welcome upon visiting the group three years ago. As a dues-paying member since then, I have participated actively, hosting Shabbat services in my home and learning Mussar (an… Read More

Quarry Not Represented By Dissatisfied Few

Rabbi Shapiro’s article “Please Be Kind” (Sept. 19) quite properly and effectively urges that, as Jews, we remember where we came from, that we treat each other with kindness and respect and that we should look out for one another. Rabbi Shapiro referenced an incident involving a small number of residents of the Quarry who… Read More

Holocaust Plaque Is a Must-Read

Basically hidden behind Joseph Sheppard’s sculpture at Baltimore’s Holocaust Memorial is a raised plaque. It bears the best, most concise explanation of the Holocaust I have ever read, just four paragraphs, written by Dr. Deborah Lipstadt. I recommend that the plaque be moved in front of Sheppard’s sculpture so that people passing by on Lombard… Read More

Rice, Repentance Go Hand-in-Hand

In this High Holiday period of reflection, the Ray Rice imbroglio (“It’s Never Too Late to Do the Right Thing,” Sept. 12’s Opening Thoughts) offers a rare opportunity for an illuminating exploration of comparative religion. Taking nothing away from the hideous nature of domestic violence, still, the Rice case nicely crystallizes the difference between rabbinic… Read More

Seek Common Ground

The most important issue to consider is what is best for Israel (“Bucking the Trend: Despite problems elsewhere, local pro-Israel students return to school confident” Sept. 2). With that in mind, I hope college students (and others) will consider the following: As most Israeli security experts agree, there is no military solution to the Israel/Palestinian… Read More

Put Your Trust in Levinson & Bros.

When my father-in-law died in Puerto Rico, one call at 3 a.m. to Sol Levinson & Bros., and they arranged everything (Family Owned & Proud of It,” Aug.22). It hurt hearing my father-in-law go from “Leon” to “the body,” but you can trust Levinson to get the job done. When my father-in-law’s body missed the… Read More

Last Thing Vaccine Makers Want Is Study

In response to Simone Ellin’s article “A Healthy Dose?” (Aug. 29), I would like to add a few points and facts.  If the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the government would conduct a long overdue study comparing the health of vaccinated children with unvaccinated children, much of the controversy surrounding this issue could… Read More

How Come No Glory for Jewish Patriots?

The exciting lives led by the two Jewish patriots profiled in the Jewish Times (“Jewish Patriots: Balancing Jewish, American Identities During the War of 1812,” Sept. 5) left me with the following question: Why haven’t Uriah Levy and Mendes Cohen been the subject of a made-for-TV series or PBS documentary? Levy was unmistakably an individual… Read More