Baltimore’s ‘Little Jerusalem’

I read with interest your obituary for Alice E. Krupsaw (Community, Jan. 10) who passed away at age 106. As stated, she documented memories of growing up in “Little Israel” on Eagle Street. As I lived near Eagle Street on Fulton Avenue, this close-knit Jewish community in Southwest Baltimore, with Wilkens Avenue running through it,… Read More

An Inseparable Part of Judaism

Maayan Jaffe cites discouraging figures from the recent Pew Research Center survey [on American Jews] to show there is a “stark disconnect” between the youngest generation of U.S. Jews and the Jewish state (“Somewhere In The Middle,” Jan. 3). How ironic, considering that her lengthy article is filled with the anti-Zionist views of people such… Read More

A Balanced Look at Conflict

The JT and writer Maayan Jaffe are to be lauded for an excellent, balanced article on the Israeli-Palestinian peace process (“Somewhere in the Middle,” Jan. 3). The examples used to support engagement with this issue reveal the challenges that present-day conditions and different historical narratives play in designing a future peace and two-state arrangement that… Read More

Mikvah Not Possible Without Architect

I am glad that you mentioned when the original mikvah was built at Beth El Congregation, acknowledging the work of Rabbi Mark Loeb and those who contributed the money for building the original facility (“Magic Water,” Dec. 20). I would like to add that the mikvah would not have been there were it not for… Read More

Kol Hakavod!

As Orthodox rabbis in both the Baltimore and Washington metropolitan areas, we were happy to read Nathan Lewin’s op-ed calling to attention the work of Rabbi Shmuel Herzfeld at the Ohev Sholom Congregation (“A Real-life Solution To The Agunah Problem,” Jan. 3). We applaud the work of Rabbi Herzfeld and support this and other important… Read More

UMBC Needs To Take A Stand

While it is heartening that the presidents of the University of Maryland and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County declared their opposition to the American Studies Association boycott of Israel, much more is required from our public universities than issuing press statements (“Boycott Earns American Studies Association an ‘F,’” Dec. 27). As the only educational… Read More

No Prejudice At Veterans Cemetery

By way of response to the letter of David. L. Fisher (“Shocked,” Dec. 20) concerning the burial of Jews in a “segregated location” at Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery: In my capacity as the commander of the Department of Maryland, Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A., I can assure him that Jewish veterans can be buried… Read More

Not Shocked At Separate Section

Just a few days ago I was present at the funeral of a friend of more than 70 years. We grew up together, and both served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean War. He was buried in a veterans’ cemetery in South Florida in the next available gravesite. I somewhat lamented the fact… Read More

Finding Flavor

I loved the Dec. 20 issue of the JT. After reading Eli Schlossberg’s article, “Jewish Food: What’s the Next Big Thing?” I was reminded of an interesting cookbook, “The World of Jewish Cooking” by Gil Marks. The author uses pictures and the history of each food to give “flavor” to our ancestors’ dishes. Lynne Selznick… Read More

Etz Chaim Gets Down

Thank you for the stunning and genuine portrayal of the Etz Chaim Center (“Tree of Life,” Nov. 29). We love what we do, and we’re so proud and happy to let people know that Jewish hearts everywhere are being touched. Just as the article was going to print we had an epic event that I… Read More