Saving a World by Changing Lives

Recently my wife, Lynda, and I participated in a World ORT mission to Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia. This opportunity to experience the work of this wonderful organization and its valuable educational network was as energizing as it was concerning, regarding the sustainability of Jewish life in Russia. Through a network of 17 schools in… Read More

America’s Schools Need to Think Small

About 27 kids sit in the average public school classroom. For a new crop of education entrepreneurs, that number is nearly perfect — for an entire school. These entrepreneurs are rebelling against the educational status quo by bringing the centuries-old one-room schoolhouse into the 21st century. They maintain new “micro schools” leverage technology to give… Read More

Passing Along the Importance of Tzedakah

Every year, as the Chanukah season approaches, I reflect on the importance of passing down one’s traditions. When our family gathers to light the menorah and say the Chanukah prayers, I am reminded of what we share with our children — the history, values and traditions that define who we are. This is so important… Read More

Keith Ellison’s Views

When Keith Ellison threw his hat into the ring to seek the chairmanship of the Democratic Party, he challenged long-held thinking about the type of person who could lead a major American political party. Ellison is both African-American and Muslim, two personal attributes that make him unique as a leading figure in American politics today… Read More

Rockefeller BDS and Campus Anti-Semitism

The New Israel Fund (NIF) recently received a grant to “research and report on anti-Semitism on U.S. campuses.” On the surface, this appears to be a welcome development — a progressive group being mobilized to confront a major social malady plaguing institutions of higher education. Beneath the surface of the September grant, however, are vested… Read More

Meaningful Giving

Lately my mind has been awash with thoughts pushing and pulling in all directions, motivated by my love of family (immediate and communal), my connection to Israel and the Jewish people and the needs of my new business. The connectedness of those things most important to me adds meaning to my life and inspires me… Read More

The Two Americas, the Two Israels

For those of us who watched the U.S. election from Israel, the results seemed eerily familiar. America’s electoral map is sharply divided: between blue and red, urban and rural, the coastal liberals and the conservative masses in the middle. In Israel, we call it the geographic divide between the “center” of the country and the… Read More

Dreaming of Health Care

Despite reports that the Affordable Care Act is in danger of being obliterated after the election, enrollment in the health insurance marketplace reopened Nov. 1 to high demand, with more than 100,000 people signing up for coverage in the first week alone. Anyone without insurance can enroll until the marketplace closes Jan. 31. Since the… Read More

Bannon and Breitbart: Friends of Israel

In his inspiring book “Words That Hurt, Words that Heal,” Rabbi Joseph Telushkin wrote, “Because words can be used to inflict devastating and irrevocable suffering, Jewish teachings go so far as to compare cruel words to murder.” Thus it is painful to see the malicious character assassination and false accusations of anti-Semitism being hurled against… Read More

What I’ve Learned from the Election Process

The biggest gift I got moving to the U.S. was the gift of listening. When you are new to a place, language and culture, you have to start listening, and it is not an easy task for a native Israeli. When the election season started, I decided to stick to the listening strategy. I was… Read More