UN’s Anti-Israel Resolutions Are Unjust

World War II taught the  international community that more needed to be done to protect at-risk cultures, especially since the war targeted the Jewish population and attempted to dissolve the Jewish identity. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), established in 1945 in response to World War II, seeks to preserve history and… Read More

When a Jew Travels to Poland

Once, when a Jewish person  announced plans to visit Germany, friends would ask, “Why would you want to go there?” They were obviously unaware of Germany’s move from its past — evident in the handsome German-Jewish History Museum, the encouragement  of new Jewish communities throughout the country and the opening of a touching outdoor memorial… Read More

Anti-Semitism: Danger to Us All

My father, Haim Hendrick Roet, a Holocaust survivor from the Netherlands, addressed the United Nations General Assembly in January during its annual Holocaust memorial ceremony with this poignant cri de coeur: “Looking back 70 years,” he said, “it is heartbreaking that as a world, we did not learn enough from the Holocaust.” Eight months later,… Read More

In Breast Cancer Testing, Knowledge Is Power

Five years ago, on a whim, Cindy, a 27-year-old Jewish woman, decided to pursue  genetic testing through an online laboratory. She wasn’t expecting any surprises because she had no family history of cancer or increased risk factors. She was young and living a healthy lifestyle. But Cindy’s results indicated that she had tested positive for… Read More

Donald, Israel and the Jews

It’s that time of the year, shortly before a presidential election with control of Congress also on the line. The American Jewish community is, as usual, asking a perennially problematic question: Which candidate will be best for  Israel? For the last 26 years, as executive director of a Jewish communal relations organization and as someone… Read More

Why Banning the Burkini is Possible in France

Every society is, in large part, the product of its history. France is no exception. In analyzing the widespread attempt by French municipalities to ban the full-body female swimsuit known as the burkini that some Muslim women insist on wearing on public beaches, it is  essential to understand the historical underpinnings of the concept of… Read More

Making a Commitment

The Hebrew month of Tishrei — October this year — is a time when we, as Jews, look at the world, from an inward and outward perspective. Beginning with Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, and concluding with Yom Kippur, we engage in soul-searching and inner  reflection on how we want to live our lives…. Read More

Strengthen Light in Maryland

Maryland’s residents have the right to know how government transacts business on their behalf. To help set this culture of openness, Maryland legislators created the Public Information Act in 1970, followed by the Open Meetings Act in 1977. There are two volunteer boards that provide an outlet for citizen complaints relating to these acts and… Read More

Of Love and Family

In September, I sat with my grandfather, David Gordon, as he recounted memories and lessons from his childhood. When I asked him, “What are the most valuable lessons that your parents have taught you?” he responded easily and without hesitation: “To love, to love people, to love your family and to take care of them.”… Read More

Republican Jews Remain Silent on Presidential Race

Jewish donors are overwhelmingly supporting former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton this election season. That comes as no surprise given that President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney received 71 percent and 29 percent, respectively, of Jewish donations in 2012. However, according to FiveThirtyEight, only 5 percent of Jewish donations to the major-party… Read More