Today’s Civil Rights Issues, Yesterday’s Heroes

[pullquote]When Malcom Sherman entered this real estate market in 1949, his goals were simple. As he stated in the Maryland Realtor, “I wanted to help families find a better quality life.”[/pullquote]As Baltimore faces unresolved racial issues, we who love this city can draw inspiration from two local Jewish heroes of the civil rights movement. To… Read More

The Times’ ‘Big Lie’ About the Temple Mount

Two weeks ago, I opened The New York Times to Rick Gladstone’s article, “Historical Certainty Proves  Elusive at Jerusalem’s Holiest Place,” happy that the newspaper of record would explain to its audience the  historical context of this embattled piece of real estate. As I read on, I was horrified. “The question, which many books and… Read More

The Politics of Death, Anti-Semitism and Jewish Paranoia

Chaim Landau is past president of the Baltimore Board of Rabbis and rabbi emeritus at Ner Tamid Congregation.

It was a sobering, sad and tragic month — and that’s before I approach the subject of Israelis killed and wounded in Israel. Let’s examine the facts: Saudi Arabia: Close to 1,800 people were killed during the Hadj, when uncontrolled forces created a surge of such intensity and fear that left an astronomic number of… Read More

Henkin Murders: What American Jews Can Do

The heartbreaking murder of Rabbi Eitam Henkin and his wife, Naama, gunned down by Palestinian terrorists in front of their children, will generate tear-filled eulogies and anguished recitations of Psalms throughout the Jewish world. As they should. But then what? The depressingly familiar post-terrorist attack ritual is already unfolding before our eyes. The Obama administration… Read More

The Drive to Inspire Kindness in the World

In this day and age, doing well and doing good are not mutually exclusive. Although the concept of tikkun olam is rooted in Jewish texts and traditions, its importance and application transcend the Jewish community and can be applied to achieve change in the world at large. Every fall, during the holiday period, I find… Read More

How to Change a Life

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Whose life will you change today? We all have the power to do it. Sometimes it’s the simple act of reaching out to a friend in need at precisely the right time. Or perhaps it’s the kindness you show a stranger during a chance encounter. What if you could change thousands of lives with a… Read More

What I Saw on the Migrants’ Road to Budapest

As our car rolled slowly toward Budapest, we saw a huge group heading in the opposite direction on the highway just outside the city: Hundreds of people quietly walking in the breakdown lane, marching toward freedom and peace. I couldn’t tell if the other drivers were lifting their heads or not, but I couldn’t look… Read More

A Missed Opportunity for Healing

I read with interest the “Personal Statement of Apology” made by Rabbi Barry Freundel in the Sept. 11th Balitmore Jewish Times. As a social worker with 30 years of clinical experience, I had hoped the rabbi might have explained, especially to the victims and the Jewish community in which he was revered, what drove him… Read More

Nights in the Sukkah

In America, Sukkot is a meteorologically challenged holiday, and our family experienced the whole panoply of challenges. From my wife’s native Omaha, Neb., with its bitter cold October nights to my native New York’s torrential rains to the oppressively hot Miami, where we lived for six years before making aliyah in 1997, Sukkot, though characterized… Read More

Yom Kippur Message: Take Nothing for Granted

On Tuesday last week, exactly one week before Rosh Hashanah, Israel awoke to a blinding sandstorm which strangely emanated from the east, from Syria and Iraq. Local meteorologists said that in the 75 years they had been keeping records, they had never seen a sandstorm coming from that direction. Generally we are affected by such… Read More