Settlement Amnesia Afflicts Martin Indyk

A form of amnesia must be affecting the Obama administration’s former chief Mideast negotiator, Martin Indyk. It is, however, a very selective kind of amnesia — he forgets only concessions that Israel has made. Speaking recently at a conference in Tel Aviv, Indyk declared that the only reason there are no peace talks between Israel… Read More

Smaller Numbers, Steady Engagement

Steven M. Cohen

When delegates to the biennial  convention of the United Synagogue of Conservative  Judaism met last week near Chicago, they sought a way forward for a movement challenged by numerical decline but holding steady in Jewish engagement. These are the main overall trends that emerge from a comparison of two national studies of American Jews  conducted… Read More

A Tale of Israeli Bureaucracy

Eliana Rudee

I remember taking my brother to the DMV in Seattle to get his driver’s license. We arrived early in the morning, took a number as we walked in, sat down in the orderly bench seats and quietly awaited our number to be called. The rowdiest the DMV got was when my brother said to me,… Read More

Thank God, Sanders Doesn’t Want to Talk Religion

At a campaign event in Virginia last week, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders invoked his Judaism in response to a question about Islamophobia in the media. The exchange drew widespread attention, in part because Sanders has mostly avoided discussion of how his religion informs his politics. The contrast between his approach and that of other… Read More

Women Rabbis: Saints or Vixens?

Rabbi Chaim Landau

It happened … once again, and not in a very subtle, nuanced deliberation. The RCA, the Agudath Yisrael of America, hard-lined leaders of Orthodoxy in America, combined forces, both verbal and strategic, to denounce, reject, and neutralize the existence of a growing Modern Orthodox trend that accepts women clergy in synagogue leadership roles. The attack… Read More

Today’s Civil Rights Issues, Yesterday’s Heroes

[pullquote]When Malcom Sherman entered this real estate market in 1949, his goals were simple. As he stated in the Maryland Realtor, “I wanted to help families find a better quality life.”[/pullquote]As Baltimore faces unresolved racial issues, we who love this city can draw inspiration from two local Jewish heroes of the civil rights movement. To… Read More

The Times’ ‘Big Lie’ About the Temple Mount

Two weeks ago, I opened The New York Times to Rick Gladstone’s article, “Historical Certainty Proves  Elusive at Jerusalem’s Holiest Place,” happy that the newspaper of record would explain to its audience the  historical context of this embattled piece of real estate. As I read on, I was horrified. “The question, which many books and… Read More

The Politics of Death, Anti-Semitism and Jewish Paranoia

Rabbi Chaim Landau

It was a sobering, sad and tragic month — and that’s before I approach the subject of Israelis killed and wounded in Israel. Let’s examine the facts: Saudi Arabia: Close to 1,800 people were killed during the Hadj, when uncontrolled forces created a surge of such intensity and fear that left an astronomic number of… Read More

Henkin Murders: What American Jews Can Do

The heartbreaking murder of Rabbi Eitam Henkin and his wife, Naama, gunned down by Palestinian terrorists in front of their children, will generate tear-filled eulogies and anguished recitations of Psalms throughout the Jewish world. As they should. But then what? The depressingly familiar post-terrorist attack ritual is already unfolding before our eyes. The Obama administration… Read More

The Drive to Inspire Kindness in the World

In this day and age, doing well and doing good are not mutually exclusive. Although the concept of tikkun olam is rooted in Jewish texts and traditions, its importance and application transcend the Jewish community and can be applied to achieve change in the world at large. Every fall, during the holiday period, I find… Read More