Staying Ahead of Crises

hazardous material crew cleans the apartment of Thomas Eric Duncan. Duncan was the first Ebola case 
diagnosed in the U.S. He died on Oct. 8.

Recent news of the first transmission of the Ebola virus in the U.S. — a nurse in Texas infected by the disease while treating the now-deceased Thomas Eric Duncan, with the CDC attributing her infection to a breakdown in protocol — is spreading fear in a way that the reality of the 4,000 dead in… Read More

On El Al, We Are One People

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Airline travel is difficult enough without passengers making a scene. But that’s what occurred on an El Al flight from New York to Tel Aviv just before Rosh Hashanah, when a number of haredi men went so far as to try to pay other passengers so they would not have to sit next to women… Read More

Sweden’s False Steps

Whether it was a declaration of diplomatic independence or a move designed to give the peace process a boost, the announcement last week by new Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven that his country plans to recognize the state of Palestine is unwelcome. While it is true that more than 130 countries have already recognized Palestine… Read More

Blood Money

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With its recent judgment against Arab Bank, a New York jury has potentially paved the way for justice in the form of significant financial penalties against the bank and compensatory payments to victims of terror and their families. We see this as a significant decision — one that through the legal process will enable victims… Read More

A Hunger for Justice

By many indicators, America is recovering from the recession that hit six years ago. The reported rates of employment, the GDP and the stock market are all moving in a positive direction. But when it comes to food security — the ability of Americans to feed themselves and their families — things are still far… Read More

­Seeing Red at Ohio University

Ohio University Student Senate President Megan Marzec made headlines last week when she responded to the university president’s ALS ice bucket challenge by pouring a bucket of blood-colored water over her head. Speaking in her official capacity as a student leader, she said the stunt was intended to send “a message of student concern of… Read More

A Quiet But Vital Role

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  Last week, President Obama outlined his strategy for dealing with the Islamic State insurgents who have swept through and now occupy parts of Syria and Iraq. In his primetime speech, the president promised that the United States will work “with our friends and allies to degrade and ultimately destroy”the Islamic State. Ten Arab countries… Read More

Back to School with BDS

The just-begun school year on college campuses is threatening an invigorated effort in support of the boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement. From academic bodies to student groups, agitation is reportedly building — ostensibly in support of the Palestinian cause — to brand Israel as an apartheid state, a colonial power and genocidal. The BDS… Read More

The Day After Gaza

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has faced much criticism for the way he conducted the war. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

If the open-ended cease-fire with Hamas is holding when you are reading these words, Israelis will be in the midst of evaluating their country’s 50-day war in Gaza in an effort to determine what went right, what went wrong and what comes next. Unlike Hamas, which declared victory after leader Khaled Mashaal came out of… Read More

An Easy Choice in Gaza

Hamas may have been trying to make an example last week through the firing-squad execution of at least 25 Palestinians accused of collaborating with Israel. But the public killings in the same week as the beheading of American journalist James Foley by the Islamic State made Hamas look not so much as the flag bearer… Read More