A Return to Civility

Americans used to talk about election- related violence and contested balloting in other countries with a degree of smugness, confident that it couldn’t happen here. Not anymore. This year’s presidential race not only has seen the thin veneer of civility torn apart, it has also raised the disquieting specter of something less than a peaceful… Read More

The Perils of Zero Tolerance

When Hillel International announced last week that it was canceling a speaking tour featuring Israeli journalist Ari Shavit, we ran a thought experiment. Shavit, widely lauded for his 2013 book “My Promised Land,” had publicly admitted that he was the man who a Jewish reporter said sexually assaulted her in 2014. Hillel’s response was swift,… Read More

Iran’s Finger Prints

An article in Al Arabiya last week dropped a small bombshell. It reported that Hassan Fariuzabadi, military adviser to Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, boasted to the semiofficial Fars news agency that his country had “sent, in the past years, military advisers to the Gaza strip and trained the ‘Palestinian forces’” there. The fact that… Read More

UNESCO Cannot Change History

There was at least one piece of good news after votes by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, or UNESCO, over the last two weeks that effectively denied the Jewish connection to Jerusalem and the Temple Mount: The body has made clear just how feckless U.N. diplomacy is. More countries opposed or abstained… Read More

Cummings, Ruppersberger, Sarbanes for Congress

Elijah Cummings (File photo)

With U.S. Reps. Elijah Cummings (D-District 7), Dutch Ruppersberger (D-District 2) and John Sarbanes (D-District 3), the Baltimore area is represented in Congress by a trio of moderate, seasoned legislators. We heartily endorse them in the Nov. 8 election. The three often act together, as in June, when they attended an event on the steps… Read More

Van Hollen for U.S. Senate

Chris Van Hollen (File photo)

In seeking to fill the U.S. Senate being left by retiring Democrat Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, Democratic candidate Chris Van Hollen, a longtime member of Congress, comes with a reputation as a legislator who is dependably liberal as well as a team player who can get things done. We supported him in the primaries against… Read More

Grounding a Billboard

The Israel Action Center this month  focused attention on a topic we wrote about here two years ago. The Reform movement-affiliated organization tried unsuccessfully to post a billboard in the waiting area of Newark Liberty International Airport that read: “Ladies, please take your seat … and keep it!” At issue was the recurrence of Haredi… Read More

Preparing the People for Peace

When President Juan Manuel Santos of Colombia won the Nobel Peace Prize on Oct. 7, his country had just narrowly voted to reject the peace treaty he had negotiated to end a half-century of civil war with the Marxist FARC guerilla movement. On the surface, it seemed like the Nobel Prize Committee was somewhat out… Read More

With Friends Like This

Anyone who would like to know what a tell-it-like-it-is, shoot-from-the-hip president is like can look to the Philippines and its leader, Rodrigo Duterte. A 71-year-old populist, Duterte fought drugs while he was mayor of Davao by allegedly ordering death-squad killings. When he took office as president in June he promised more of the same. Since… Read More

Is Caesar the Answer?

The Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act is a bipartisan bill designed to sanction the Syrian regime of Bashar al-Assad for mass murder and crimes against humanity. The bill would also sanction entities that support Assad, namely Russia and Iran. The Obama administration is reportedly seeking to weaken the bill, in an apparent attempt to avoid… Read More