A Tragedy Made In Bangladesh

In the Jewish imagination, the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City is a kind of slavery-in-Egypt story: We all were there. One hundred forty-six workers — most were Jewish and Italian immigrant women bet-ween 14 and 43 years old — died in the fire because the managers had locked them in. The… Read More

Thinking Beyond Day School Education

With the announcement last week that the 22-year old Day School at Baltimore Hebrew will close at the end of the school year and not be replaced by the Independent Jewish Academy of Baltimore, as had been planned, it is time for a sober assessment of the demand for day school education in our community.

Hawking’s Other Choice

Stephen Hawking isn’t the first big name to ann-ounce he is boycotting Israel. And he won’t be the last. But as one of the world’s most famous and revered scientists, his decision to withdraw from speaking at a prestigious academic conference in Israel next month is a bigger blow than the posturing of a rock… Read More

Clergy In A Changing Health Care Landscape

In the changing landscape brought about by the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, lack of knowledge can be detrimental to those who might benefit most from the new health-care options. That’s not only the 14 percent of Marylanders who lack insurance. The “need for knowledge” applies to everyone covered by the act.

Anticipating A New Israeli Chief Rabbi

Many Jews who are concerned about ultra-Orthodox control of religious life in Israel are looking to the election in June of a new Ashkenazi chief rabbi as an opportunity to set the country on a more moderate course. Those seeking change see Modern Orthodox Rabbi David Stav as their best hope.

Responding To Chemical Weapons In Syria

“How many uses of chemical weapons does it take to cross a publicly declared red line against the use of chemical weapons?” That is the angry question being asked by many since the U.S. concluded last week, “with varying degrees of confidence,” that the Assad regime had used chemical weapons against its own citizens —… Read More

Needed: State Aid

Since the mid-1950s, the majority view within the Jewish community has opposed government aid to parochial schools on the grounds that it diverts funds from the public schools, breaches the “wall of separation” between religion and state, and runs counter to the communal responsibility to support our own institutions.

A Partner Departs

If Salam Fayyad hadn’t been the Palestinian Authority’s prime minister, would the West and Israel have had to create him? In a way they did. And following Fayyad’s resignation April 13 (he’ll stay on in a caretaker capacity until a new government is formed), his Western and Israeli allies will face a PA that is… Read More

Looking To Learn From Boston

We have much to learn from the Boston bombing. Now that suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is under arrest and charged with one count of using a weapon of mass destruction and one count of malicious destruction of property resulting in death—which could bring him the death penalty—political and security chiefs need to examine how this tragic… Read More

Opposing Churches On Israel

As Christians and Jews gather during their respective Easter and Passover holidays this weekend, we recall all that American Jews and liberal Protestants have accomplished together. But pride in the past should not blind us to the danger that this relationship could be derailed by pernicious responses to the Arab-Israeli conflict within certain churches.