Still Going Strong at 90


As it turns 90 next month, the Owings Mills-based Central Scholarship Bureau is celebrating the more than 7,000 underprivileged students statewide who have pursued higher education because of its largesse. Originally founded as a solely Jewish organization, today CSB distributes more than $1 million of financial aid annually, offering interest-free loans and scholarships of up… Read More

A Life Wonderfully Lived


Known for her many sayings, Ida Goldberg, who passed away Saturday, Sept. 27 at the age of 104, lived by the motto, “Old age is not for sissies.” Born in Sosnowiec, Poland on Dec. 12, 1909 to Aaron and Sophia Noonberg, her family left Eastern Europe for America when Ida was only 3 years old…. Read More

Presbyterian Minister Addresses BHC

Baltimore Hebrew Congregation hosted the Rev. Andrew Foster Connors at its Friday, Sept. 19 service as part of the congregation’s one-week pulpit exchange with Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church. “Tonight, I recognize that that peace has been jeopardized by the actions of the Presbyterian Church’s General Assembly in actions it took over the summer,”… Read More

No Rainout for Rosh Hashanah Under the Stars


Although it was a chilly night with the looming threat of rain, Rosh Hashanah Under the Stars went off without a hitch last week. According to organizers of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation’s eighth annual event, thousands descended on Oregon Ridge Park Sept. 24 for an evening service featuring the synagogue’s rabbis and cantors, a choir and… Read More

Men May Have Been Targeted for Religion

At least one man believes he and two others were targeted because of their religion in an incident that took place on Old Pimlico Road around 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 25, the first day of Rosh Hashanah. Three males were walking in the 6800 block of Old Pimlico Road when a car pulled up… Read More

Shift in Power


With the Republican Party pushing to retake control of the Senate in the upcoming November elections, a partisan shift in power may significantly affect a broad range of foreign policy and domestic social issues that are prioritized by American Jews. Midterm elections in the Senate and House of Representatives historically have been difficult for the… Read More

Looking for Answers


On the day almost five years ago when a neurologist told him the tremor in his right hand was a symptom of Parkinson’s disease, Andrew Katz cried all the way home. His father had suffered from the disease, and he knew what it could mean for his future. Still, Katz, who was 62 at the… Read More

Just Screen It


For most people, the chances of being a Tay-Sachs carrier are one in 250. But Ashkenazi Jews face far worse odds with a “high-risk” carrier rate of one in 30, according to the National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association (NTSAD). Yet, through screening, Tay-Sachs has been less prevalent in recent years among the Jewish population…. Read More

From Eastern Europe to Owings Mills


Rabbi Nachum Katsenelenbogen always knew his father was a hero. Arrested by the NKVD, predecessor to the KGB, in 1950, Moshe Katsenelenbogen spent seven-and-a-half years in a Soviet prison simply for being Jewish. Once he was free, he poured his heart into instilling a strong love of Judaism in his children. As a Chabad-Lubavitch emissary… Read More

Being Purple


In order to take the governor’s mansion on Election Day, Republican Larry Hogan must find a way to turn the state’s majority-registered Democrats into Republican voters. To do so, he and his party are working to turn voters’ attention away from social issues such as gun control and abortion and toward the economy. “When we… Read More