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In Hebrew-immersion day camps, summer fun is augmented with learning
BY Talia Lavin, JTA
March 6, 2014

It used to be that parents who wanted to expose their children to conversational Hebrew over the summer had to travel to Israel. Now a growing number of American Jewish day camps are offering Hebrew-immersion programs, where kids do the standard day camp activities — swimming, arts and crafts, music, zip-lining and field trips — CONTINUE »

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March 6, 2014

Debbi Weinberg grew up attending Jewish camps. From Milldale to Louise to Timber Ridge, camps have been a major part of this Baltimore native and Pikesville High School graduate’s life since she was very young. In addition to her full-time role as founder and director of GEM (Girls’ Empowerment Mission), Weinberg also serves as co-chair CONTINUE »

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BY Lauren Root
February 6, 2014

It’s green, bushy and lurks in leaves of three: It’s poison ivy. Urushiol is an oily allergen that is found on the leaves of poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. This toxin causes an uncomfortable skin rash that can easily spread to another person. With an abundance of nature-rich camp activities, it is important CONTINUE »

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February 6, 2014

Summer is not the only time that kids can enjoy a fun and educational camping experience. Nip boredom in the bud: Get your 9 to 12-year-olds away from TV and video games and give them an enriching spring break by enrolling them in Junior Achievement of Central Maryland’s Biz Town Spring Break Camp in Owings CONTINUE »

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Modern American Jews owe debt of gratitude to founders of Jewish summer camps
BY Elizabeth Schuman
February 6, 2014

One dollar was all it took. At least, that’s how longtime director Sara Yudlson recounted the start of Camp Louise in a self-published history. Post World War I, she writes, immigrants were pouring into the United States. Many young women worked long hours in crowded, unsafe factories. Lillie Meyer Straus, the wife of Aaron Straus, CONTINUE »