Son of a Stitch


Photos provided The sewing machine looked harmless enough until it almost shot him. Mike Peisach, a veteran of the Korean War, fished a live .32-caliber bullet from under the needle plate of a machine during a routine repair. Peisach, who started repairing sewing machines when he was 15, has handed down death warrants on many… Read More

Foundry Row Moving Forward


Foundry Row developers have cleared another hurdle in their plans to build a Wegmans-anchored mixed-use center on Reisterstown Road. Development plans by Greenberg Gibbons and Vanguard, the companies building Foundry Row at the site of the old Solo Cup factory, were approved on Feb. 24. Arguments opposed to the plans were also rejected in the… Read More

Boycott Update

Maryland’s anti-boycott bill may not be dead, but it’s on life support. Two weeks after hearings on the bill in the Senate Budget and Taxation and House Appropriations committees, the bill that dropped in the House of Delegates with 51 co-sponsors has undergone a lot of trimming, including an amendment that would strip it of… Read More

The Stories That Connect Us

Editorial Director

At a time in life when others get lost in music or drugs or the high school social scene, one particular headstrong 16-year-old decides that his teenage rebellion requires wearing a yarmulke. He knows little about kashrut, even less about Jewish history and practice, but he knows that he’s Jewish. And so he makes a… Read More

Community Protests Murderer’s Appeal

Poster for support event

Approximately 250 people from Baltimore’s Jewish community traveled by bus, car and subway train to protest the appeal trial of then 24-year-old Wayne Stephen Young, who was convicted of killing 11-year-old Esther Lebowitz in 1969. A student of the Bais Yaakov School for Girls, she was last seen in Pikesville after being dropped off at… Read More

Embracing the Purim Spirit

Editorial Director

You certainly don’t need to be reminded, but there’s nothing like spending Purim in Baltimore. As if last week’s pre-holiday carnivals weren’t enough, entire streets became parking lots on Sunday, bumper-to-bumper traffic competing with costumed revelers in the race to deliver precious shlach manot to neighbors and friends. The scene was one of tremendous unity,… Read More

Synagogue to Press Charges

A California synagogue is expected to file criminal charges against its former executive director, Eric Levine, a Bethesda resident who most recently worked for Adas Israel Congregation in the District, for allegedly stealing almost $400,000 over a five-year period. “We anticipate that criminal charges are going to be filed,” said Sonia Israel, president of Congregation… Read More

Not a Passing Hobby


The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments March 25 on two prominent cases that could have far-reaching effects on Jewish-owned businesses and their employees. Both challenge the legality of an Affordable Care Act mandate requiring firms with more than 50 employees to provide contraception coverage as part of their insurance policies. Jewish organizations have… Read More

Eyes on Ukraine


The increasing political and economic unrest in Ukraine has prompted The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore to launch the Ukraine Assistance Fund in order to provide urgent funds needed for the care and security for more than 300,000 Jews in Ukraine. According to The Associated, Ukraine is home to some of the world’s poorest… Read More