The Buzz on Drones

Like small buzzing, flying pests, drones seem to be everywhere these days: a technology waiting for mass acceptance by filling newspaper columns, YouTube videos and the nightmares of those Americans who see them as a privacy and safety disaster waiting to happen. They’ve been touted as the answer for jobs that are too dirty and… Read More

Opinions Divided on Subminimum Wage

Advocates and employers of disabled individuals are divided on a section of federal law that allows certified agencies to employ those with disabilities below minimum wage. Some want the program phased out, some would like to see increased oversight and program improvements, while others simply want the issue studied further. The Fair Labor Standards Act,… Read More

Slow … Quick, Quick, Slow

Baltimore native John Dawson, owner and head instructor of dance StudioDNA in Pikesville, teaches a smooth fox trot and a spicy salsa, but some of his students feel they gain more than improved rhythm and sure footing. More confidence, a sense of accomplishment and feelings of grace and pure joy are also what keeps these… Read More

Good As New

Congregants packed the halls of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation for a once-in-a-lifetime experience: the chance to help repair a Torah scroll that survived the Holocaust and dates back at least 250 years. “It was great,” said Linda Speert, who helped write an aleph on the scroll the afternoon of Sunday, Dec. 14. She wanted to bring… Read More

Alphabet Soup

The announcement last week that HIAS, the century-old Jewish immigrant and refugee aid organization, will relocate its headquarters from New York City to Silver Spring is just another sign that the Jewish organizational universe is changing. Once known as the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, the agency has responded to the end of Jewish refugee immigration… Read More

Silver Lining

“Repoussé Style Then and Now,” the Johns Hopkins University Evergreen Museum and Library’s latest exhibition, features the intricate metal work of artist Michael Izrael Galmer, a Russian Jew who emigrated to America from the former Soviet Union. Galmer, 67, said his career as an artist would not have been possible in Russia, due to anti-Semitism… Read More

Chanukah and the Holidays

Dozens of cars drove down Interstate 83 with giant electric menorahs on their roofs Tuesday night to mark the first night of Chanukah. The spectacle culminated in the lighting of a 30-foot menorah at McKeldin Square in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. While some feel such displays may oversell a Jewish holiday that isn’t as significant as… Read More

Rabbis Face Off

Two well-known D.C. rabbis squared off in civil court this week, resulting in the loser being virtually barred from George Washington University’s campus. “You can call up the president of the university and wish him Happy New Year,” was all Superior Court Judge Neal E. Kravitz said that Rabbi Yehuda Steiner, affectionately called “Yudi” by… Read More

Alan Gross Comes Home

U.S. contractor Alan Gross, who was imprisoned by the Cuban government for five years, returned home to Maryland Wednesday in what was dubbed by many as a Chanukah miracle. Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), who was informed Tuesday night by Vice President Joe Biden of Gross’ release, was at Joint Base Andrews in Prince George’s County… Read More

Statement from Gross on Return Home from Cuba

Upon returning home from five years of imprisonment in Cuba, Alan Gross had the following to say: “Chag Sameach.  What a blessing to be a citizen of the United States of America.  Thank you President Obama for everything you have done today. I want to acknowledge the extraordinary and determined efforts of my wife of… Read More