Singer-Songwriter Finds His Voice Jesse Macht gained inspiration from tribulation

Jesse Macht (Photos provided)

For singer-songwriters, tragedy can become fertile ground for creative inspiration. In Jesse Macht’s case, a brush with mortality and the end of long-term relationship was all he needed to jumpstart his career. After discovering that he had a heart condition that gave him an extra electric impulse that caused his heart to beat at 260… Read More

A Budget Problem

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With an approaching budget deficit in the $600 million range, both experts and state political figures predict 2015 to be the year of the budget. “Unless the estimates are wildly off and the state’s able to generate a lot more revenue than they expect, I think the budget is going to be the first, the… Read More

Helping Hands

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In keeping with Sam Seliger’s sentiment that “ helping people is really important to me,”  he invited his bar mitzvah guests to participate in a service project as part of his celebration. The prosthetic hands Seliger and his friends assembled will be sent to help land-mine victims and others in countries around the world. On… Read More

For the Love of Books

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Jacob Benesch loves books. The Ilchester Elemenary school fourth-grader can quickly rattle off a few of his favorite titles — “Harry Potter,” “Percy Jackson,” “Ungifted” — and has difficulty narrowing down his favorite genre. It is no surprise then that Jacob, an outgoing 9-year-old from Ellicott City, was chosen to represent Baltimore on the 2014-2015… Read More

The Buzz on Drones

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Like small buzzing, flying pests, drones seem to be everywhere these days: a technology waiting for mass acceptance by filling newspaper columns, YouTube videos and the nightmares of those Americans who see them as a privacy and safety disaster waiting to happen. They’ve been touted as the answer for jobs that are too dirty and… Read More

Opinions Divided on Subminimum Wage

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Advocates and employers of disabled individuals are divided on a section of federal law that allows certified agencies to employ those with disabilities below minimum wage. Some want the program phased out, some would like to see increased oversight and program improvements, while others simply want the issue studied further. The Fair Labor Standards Act,… Read More

Slow … Quick, Quick, Slow

StudioDNA owner and instructor John Dawson gives a posture pointer to student Donna Siegel, who says for her, “dancing is pure joy.”

Baltimore native John Dawson, owner and head instructor of dance StudioDNA in Pikesville, teaches a smooth fox trot and a spicy salsa, but some of his students feel they gain more than improved rhythm and sure footing. More confidence, a sense of accomplishment and feelings of grace and pure joy are also what keeps these… Read More

Good As New

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Congregants packed the halls of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation for a once-in-a-lifetime experience: the chance to help repair a Torah scroll that survived the Holocaust and dates back at least 250 years. “It was great,” said Linda Speert, who helped write an aleph on the scroll the afternoon of Sunday, Dec. 14. She wanted to bring… Read More

Alphabet Soup

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The announcement last week that HIAS, the century-old Jewish immigrant and refugee aid organization, will relocate its headquarters from New York City to Silver Spring is just another sign that the Jewish organizational universe is changing. Once known as the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, the agency has responded to the end of Jewish refugee immigration… Read More

Silver Lining

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“Repoussé Style Then and Now,” the Johns Hopkins University Evergreen Museum and Library’s latest exhibition, features the intricate metal work of artist Michael Izrael Galmer, a Russian Jew who emigrated to America from the former Soviet Union. Galmer, 67, said his career as an artist would not have been possible in Russia, due to anti-Semitism… Read More