Surprise Ending

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“What is being done to silence this man?” an American rabbi asked in a 1963 letter to the Anti-Defamation League. He was talking about the novelist Philip Roth, whose early novels and short stories cast his fellow American Jews in what some considered a none-too-flattering light. Fast-forward half a century. On Thursday, the writer whose… Read More

Eye On The Future

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Israel’s business community has increasingly turned eastward toward booming Asian markets — so much so it was recently reported that in 2014, Israel is expected to export more on an annual basis to Asia than it will to the United States. Fittingly, then, Asian countries had a major presence at the prestigious MIXiii — Israel… Read More

An Israeli Olympic equestrian?

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YAGUR, Israel — The crowd was sparse and admission was free. Pop music from 10 years ago blared from loudspeakers. A few families sat on bleachers near the athletes, who hopped over a low fence when it was time to compete. The Israeli Equestrian Championships wasn’t the most obvious place to look for an accomplished… Read More

‘For Whom It Stands’

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The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture is adding to the state’s 200th Star Spangled Banner celebration with a new exhibit, “For Whom It Stands,” which examines the meaning of the American flag in a manner that is “inclusive, culturally diverse and interactive,” according to the museum’s executive director, Dr…. Read More

More Than Music

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“How do you get to Carnegie Hall?” Just ask Erika Schon, conductor of the Baltimore chapter of HaZamir: The International Jewish Teen Choir. The choir recently returned from HaZamir’s annual festival in New York, which culminated in a performance at Carnegie Hall on March 30. Schon’s group includes 36 youngsters in grades 8 to 12… Read More

Dancing with Autism

After she adopted her son Neal, Elaine Hall created the Miracle Project, a program that uses musical theater to engage autistic children and teens
(Provided)

During Passover of 1996, Elaine Hall traveled from Los Angeles to Russia to adopt her then 2-year-old son, Neal. A year later, Neal would be diagnosed with autism, and Hall would begin an odyssey that would change not only her life and Neal’s life, but also the lives of the many others they would touch…. Read More

‘A Testament To Freedom’

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Glenn Marcus grew up in the flickering light of the old-style movie house, not today’s corporate multiplex cinemas. The smell of mustiness and popcorn still takes him back to the Hollywood Theatre in Arbutus, which his grandfather owned and ran as a mom-and-pop business: his aunt sold concessions, his dad helped out with the books… Read More

Seizing An Opportunity

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Living in the fast-paced world of evolving mobile technology, two young Israeli entrepreneurs have invented what they hope will revolutionize the one device that they feel “got left behind” and seems to have missed the mobile revolution train: the printer. Tuvia Elbaum and Matan Caspi, both 29 and students at the Jerusalem College of Technology… Read More

‘Touchdown Israel’

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Almost four years ago, San Francisco-based documentary filmmaker Paul Hirschberger began learning all he could about the North American-style of tackle football that is being played in Israel. He has turned the research into his first sports film, “Touchdown Israel,” about how the growing sport is bridging cultural gaps in Israel. “I was looking for… Read More

Art Outside

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In its more than 150-year history, Druid Hill Park has seen transitions, just as many venerable urban locations often do. Yet, it has continued to serve as a green and peaceful respite to many communities in Baltimore and for the Jewish community in particular, up to the early 1960s. Barbara Shapiro, life-long Baltimorean, city advocate… Read More