Best of Both Worlds

070414_waxmanAfter moving to the United States from Scotland in 1998, Richard Waxman saw a country built upon opportunity. And today, more than ever, Waxman is getting a renewed taste for that same thirst for success that brought him to this country more than 16 years ago.

His newest venture started, like many ideas, at a Shabbat dinner table. The Waxmans of Reisterstown sat alongside family friends and heard the worries and troubles from an acquaintance’s aging mother who was downsizing and needed help with such an overwhelming endeavor.

A few weeks later, Waxman took a leap. After many difficult conversations with his wife, Melanie, Waxman decided to leave his job as a vice president of Clear Channel Outdoor. Waxman then founded Principle Lifestyle Management, a concierge and lifestyle management firm dedicated to “bringing the professionalism, diligence and attention to detail of the British and mix it with the American thirst for success and achievement of potential,” as explained on the Reisterstown company’s website.

“I felt as if I was in a now-or-never time in my life,” said Waxman, whose son’s October bar mitzvah is quickly approaching. “I left a very stable company, job and income, but I felt like it was time to build something of my own; the reality is that there’s really no good time to start a business.”

Waxman said he finds in the local Jewish community comfort to cope, especially with the uphill battle fought by a new business. Noting the various different Jewish communities he has lived in, “Baltimore is simply the best,” Waxman said.

“Local businesses are the core of the community, and we want to be a part of the core, both within the Jewish community and broader Baltimore community as a whole,” he added.

In between meetings with prospective clients, Waxman described his company’s focus: “We’re defining time as a commodity, and it’s the most precious of commodities. Once people view time as we see it, I think people will realize how much we can simplify and de-stress the lives of our clients.”

The services Principal Lifestyle Management provides are divided between virtual tasks, hands-on tasks and third-party tasks, which consists utilizing a long list of local experts to assist in completing whatever needs to get done. All third-party vendors are fully licensed and undergo extensive background checks, says Waxman.

Melanie Waxman speaks candidly about her husband’s new business venture and her positive outlook regarding the uncertainty that looms ahead.

“His attention to detail I find intensively annoying, but it has only served him success,” she said with a chuckle.

When recounting the many late-night conversations the couple had prior to Richard leaving his stable and high-level job, Melanie remained exceptionally supportive. “At the end of the day, I have no doubt that he will be successful because he won’t let anyone down, especially himself,” she said.

One of Waxman’s clients, Brown Capital managing director Marty Steinik, effuses support for Waxman, noting that PLM is saving him “headaches, time and money.”

After buying a new house recently, he needed many jobs done but didn’t have the time to manage the various large-scale and time-consuming projects, so Waxman simply took care of everything.

“Richard is simply the best solution in town and the level of trust and commitment between him and myself is extensive and unparalleled,” said Steinik.

Aware that trust between Waxman and his clients is central to the sustainable success and growth of PLM, Waxman said, “If we handle a roofing project, it’s going to be handled the same way as if it were a room on my house protecting my family. Period.”

Living nearly half of his life in the United Kingdom and the other half in the United States, Waxman notes the often-overlooked cultural and socioeconomic undertones ever-present in both countries. Through PLM, Waxman seeks to capitalize on the most redeeming qualities of the British and American mindsets in order to create a quick yet obsessively meticulous service to his clients, he said.

After catching his breath, Waxman smiled and plainly said, “There’s nothing I can’t do.”

Justin Hayet is a local freelance writer. He can be reached at jhayet1@binghamton.edu.

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