It’s Showtime In Baltimore

Is it our imagination or is Charm City’s arts scene super Jewish this fall? Whether it is theater, film, dance, music or visual arts, Jewish themes, venues and performers are stealing the spotlight. The following is a guide to some of the hottest picks of this eclectic and artful season.

 

Virtuous Virtuoso

Piano prodigy to open Gordon Center’s 19th Season

Ethan Bortnick has traveled the world. He will be at the Gordon Center next month.

Ethan Bortnick has traveled the world. He will be at the Gordon Center next month.

Ethan Bortnick has traveled the world. He will be at the Gordon Center next month.

Ethan Bortnick is short in stature, but tall on talent. The 12-year-old musician will wow audiences at the Gordon Center For Performing Arts, when he opens the venue’s fall 2013 season — its 19th — on Oct. 12. Although his father and manager, Gene Bortnick, said the family doesn’t think of Ethan as a prodigy, he
admits that he and his wife, Hannah Bortnick, both Ukrainian immigrants, are “beyond overwhelmed” by what their son can do. MORE>>

 

CrackerJack Theater

Fall theater season offers something for everyone

Bruce Randolph Nelson will star in two Jewish-themed plays this fall. Shown here, he takes the stage  as Groucho Marx in Centerstage’s  revival of “Animal Crackers.” (Photos by Richard Anderson)

Bruce Randolph Nelson will star in two Jewish-themed plays this fall. Shown here, he takes the stage as Groucho Marx in Centerstage’s revival of “Animal Crackers.” (Photos by Richard Anderson)

It will be a busy and intensely Jewish fall for veteran actor Bruce Randolph Nelson. The City Paper’s choice for best actor of 2012, Nelson is playing Jewish comedian Groucho Marx in Centerstage’s revival of “Animal Crackers” and Jewish artist Mark Rothko in Everyman Theatre’s production of “Red,” all within a three-month period. In fact, said Nelson, the last week of “Animal Crackers,” which is a wacky musical comedy, will be the first week of rehearsals for “Red,” which is a serious drama.

But Nelson, 47, a longtime member of Everyman’s resident company, isn’t complaining about the demands of his schedule or the remarkably dissimilar roles he will play in such short order. In fact, he couldn’t be happier. MORE>>

 

2.MOZART---QUEEN-OF-THE-NIGHTLooking Forward

New exhibitions offer visual intrigue, big ideas

American Visionary Art Museum founder and director Rebecca Alban Hoffberger calls the museums’ new exhibition, “Human, Soul & Machine: The Coming Singularity,” opening on Oct. 5, one of the most important and most prescient ones AVAM has ever developed.

Although the multiple issues raised by technology’s ever-growing impact on our society are the subjects of many creative projects, Hoffberger pointed out that recent events — such as the gathering of journalists’ phone records, secret drone strikes and the recent chemical attack allegedly carried out by the Syrian government against its own citizens — have only made the exhibition more timely and the questions it raises more critical. MORE>>

 

Lights On At Eutaw Place

Toby Lightman shines

Toby Lightman

Toby Lightman

Even if you haven’t heard Toby Lightman’s name, you’ve probably heard her music. Since her first album, “Little Things,” debuted in 2004, the 35-year-old singer-songwriter’s music has been virtually everywhere. Lightman will be in Baltimore on Nov. 2, when she performs at Eutaw Place, a venue that has featured up-and-coming singer-songwriters since spring 2012.

Although Lightman, who grew up in a Jewish family in Cherry Hill, N.J., performs live regularly and has made four albums since “Little Things,” her music is heard most widely on television shows including “Brothers and Sisters,” “Eli Stone,” “Bones” and “The Vampire Diaries” and in movies such as “P.S. I Love You,” “17 Again” and “Mean Girls 2.”MORE>>

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